|Home| |Questions| |Parent Guide| |News| |Search| |Clinicians| |Get Published| |Resources| |Forums| |Dr. Ravel|

Pediatric Dental Health

 

August 1, 2003

MANAGEMENT OF DENTAL TRAUMA IN CHILDREN
Injuries to children’s teeth can be very distressing for children as well as their parents. Dental trauma may occur as a result of a sports mishap, an altercation, a fall inside of the home, or other causes. Prompt treatment is essential for the long-term health of an injured tooth. Obtaining dental care within 30 minutes can make the difference between saving or loosing a tooth.

Causes and frequency of dental trauma
Approximately 30% of children have experienced dental injuries. Injuries to the mouth include teeth that are: knocked out, fractured, forced out of position, pushed up, or loosened. Root fracture and dental bone fractures can also occur.

The peak period for trauma to the primary teeth is 18 to 40 months of age, because this is a time of increased mobility for the relatively uncoordinated toddler. Injuries to primary teeth usually result from falls and collisions as the child learns to walk and run.

With the permanent teeth: school-aged boys suffer trauma almost twice as frequently as girls. Sports accidents and fights are the most common cause of dental trauma in teenagers. The upper (maxillary) central incisors are the most commonly injured teeth. Maxillary teeth protruding more than 4 mm are two to three times as likely to suffer dental trauma than normally aligned teeth.

Types of dental trauma
Dentoalveolar trauma may be classified into categories based on treatment protocols. These categories include: dental avulsion, dental luxation and extrusion, enamel and crown fracture, dental intrusion, dental concussion and subluxation, root fracture, and alveolar bone fracture.

Clinical evaluation of dental trauma


 


  |Licensing| |Tell A Friend| |Link To Us| |Disclaimer| |Copyright| |About Us| |Privacy|